Get Involved

Why Get Involved?

In conflicts around the world, education is a deliberate target for attack by armed forces and groups. Here are just a few of the many reasons why this matters:

  • For students and their communities: In addition to the risk of death, injury, and psychological distress, attacks on and military use of learning spaces keep children out of school, sometimes permanently, thwarting their hopes and dreams for the future. Girls can be disproportionately impacted, as families are wary of sending their girls to schools occupied by soldiers. Parents also stop sending their daughters for fear of sexual violence at school or on the way.

  • For governments: Investments in education by governments and the international community are squandered when education buildings are damaged or destroyed; physical and psychological trauma hinders the ability of students and teachers to learn and teach; and education quality declines as teachers are intimidated and their performance is impaired.

  • For the world: With half of the world’s out-of-school children living in conflict-affected countries, the goal of universal primary education will not be reached if we fail to protect schools from attack by warring parties and from occupation for military purposes.

How You Can Help

Help raise awareness about the devastating impact of attacks on students, teachers, schools, and universities, and the military use of school facilities.

  • Watch the Education under Attack 2014 video above and share it on social media along with the hashtag #Safe4Learning.

  • Join the #EducationCountdown campaign to achieve universal primary education by the end of 2015. Send a letter to UN Ambassadors urging their governments to endorse and implement the Lucens Guidelines.

  • Join students and teachers around the world in voicing support to end military use of schools — Contribute photos and slogans to EMUSCampaign.org.

 

 
GCPEA Secretariat

 

The GCPEA Secretariat in New York City, July 2014 

From left to right: Mari Soliván, Program and Advocacy Officer; Diya Nijhowne, Director; Charles von Rosenberg, Program Officer

Photo courtesy of Zara Riaz